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Wise About Water

Finding The Watershed Management Division’s Public Notices

Activities that affects lakes, ponds, rivers,streams and wetlands may require a permit from the Watershed Management Division before proceeding.  As part of the process to determine whether a permit will be issued, information about the activity, the application, and any additional requirements are made available to adjacent land owners and …

Biological Indicators of Healthy Waters

Healthy rivers and streams tend to indicate a healthy lake. There are many indicators that can describe the health of the water, some more accessible than others.  Taking samples to a lab to test for parameters such as dissolved oxygen, pH, conductivity and nutrients is often the standard procedure.  Using …

Cyanobacteria Resources for Vermonters

Take a look at the Watershed Management Division’s blog (called “Flow”) for a list of the 2017 cyanobacteria resources available for Vermonters.  These include a new video from the Health Department.  Learn about cyanobacteria so you can play safe on the water!

Slow it, Spread it, Sink It

Water moving across the land picks up and carries many things with it as it moves.  Fast moving water has a lot of power and can move large items – trees, buildings, even boulders.  Slow water carries things too.  Since slow-flowing water doesn’t have much power, it carries small things like soil …

New Dragonfly and Damselfly Atlas Available

The Vermont Center for Ecosystem Studies has opened a new online atlas of Vermont dragonflies and damselflies.   These lovely insects are keystone species for many of our smaller ponds and an indicator of overall shore land health.  You may remember from studies completed by the VT Lakes and Ponds Program, that …

Trees, trees, trees!

There are more than 4.5 million acres of forest in Vermont, roughly 78% of the state.  Those trees are doing a lot of work – protecting our waters, storing carbon, influencing our weather, and providing a variety of wood products.  Though we don’t always realize it, our backyard and lakeshore trees are …

Fall Turnover and Winter Stratification

Spring turnover is a big deal here in the Lakes and Ponds Program. Our staff and volunteers conduct an early season sampling blitz (Spring P) to capture water conditions while lakes and ponds are fully mixed.  Teams strive to reach dozens of lakes in the few weeks before summer stratification …

2012 National Lakes Assessment Report Available

Every five years, the EPA coordinates the National Lakes Assessment (NLA), an intensive sampling event for lakes across the country. Teams visit a group of randomly selected locations representing a cross-section of lakes in each state.  While there, they collect samples for nutrients and to examine biological communities.  They also …